The U.S. Healthcare Law Rollout
Where Do We Stand?

Summary

  • Richard Blumenthal

    Given that premiums for the millions losing their policies are skyrocketing as they are forced to purchase products they don’t want, how does the affordable part of the ‘vision’ persevere?

    • zzz05

      Well, the millions gaining policies, who beforehand were forced to NOT purchase products they DID want, come into play and they’re not nearly as vocal; so the true effect of the Act on affordability won’t be obvious until later, in hindsight. I’m not saying this to be argumentative, just pointing it out. My own half-educated hunch is that it’ll be somewhat of a wash, with little direct effect, and so just how the system equilibrates itself to the indirect effects will determine things.

      • Richard Blumenthal

        So far the millions you speak of are actually 106,000, including nobody knows how many new medicaid recipients who did not need this law to amend the medicaid rules.

  • lksugarman

    Will this be available online or recorded for later access online?

    • croache

      Hi — we will post the on-demand video to this website later this week. Thanks.

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    Barry Needalman: Why does the moral issue of universal coverage have no traction with the American public? I have not heard any proponent of the ACA raise the issue of health care inequality.

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    Ruth Rabinowitz: how did the supreme court decision impact so negatively on the intended policy. Ruth

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    Guest494 (guest): Will you address the issue of reaching a critical mass of young and healthy people signing up for coverage that will make it economically feasible for insurers to offer quality care with affordable rates?

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    TamaraDemko (guest): For the states that have not expanded Medicaid, do the panelists see any opportunities for a compromise wherein states can gradually wean themselves from federal funding and use expansion money to develop more state-specific,sustainable systems? Health care has traditionally been left to the states. Many states do not feel the incentives are properly aligned in the ACA and fear further dependence on a federal government in debt.The SCOTUS decision creates an open system of opt-out and, therefore, in many ways, cannot work like the more closed system in Massachusetts. The risk pool is skewed.

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    Guest638 (guest): I am from India which has universal healthcare. I have studied Obamacare, it is similar to Arogyasri implemented in the south state of AP, India.The state government was bankrupted due to the policy. Just like obamacare giving free care for BPL who are about some percentage. Is Obamacare heading the same way?

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM CHATROLL

    Ruth Rabinowitz: what does the financial modelling show about the increased cost of health care and where will that money ultimately come from. Ruth

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    Dear expert participants,
    How is or isn’t the direct pay primary care model compatible with the new healthcare act/model?

    Thank you,
    Miklos

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    For the states that have not expanded Medicaid, do the panelists see any opportunities for a compromise wherein states can gradually wean themselves from federal funding and use expansion money to develop more state-specific, sustainable systems? Health care has traditionally been left to the states. Many states do not feel the incentives are properly aligned in the ACA and fear further dependence on a federal government in debt. The SCOTUS decision creates an open system of opt-out and, therefore, in many ways, cannot work like the more closed system in Massachusetts. The risk pool is skewed.
    Tamara Y. Demko, J.D., M.P.H.

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    HOW DO WE COMPARE WITH OTHER DEVELOPING AND DEVELOPED COUNTRIES ON HEALTH CARE LAWS AND WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE EXPERIENCES OF OTHER COUNTRIES IN ENFORCING HEALTH CARE LAWS TO PROTECT THE LIVES OF MANY FROM DISABLING INFECTIOUS AND NON-ENFECTIOUS DISEASES?

    PLEASE GIVE COMMENTS ON HOW THE US AFFORDABLE CARE ACT IMPACT SPECIFICALLY MENTAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES FOR AMERICANS?
    Thank you.
    Erlinda G, BARRANDA, M.A., M.SC., MD
    Columbus ,Ohio

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    Can we expect, and trust, politicians to design, and implement a workable, efficient, and affordable health care system for our country considering the very limited involvement of experienced health care providers in the planning process? This is a very complex process and for a success of any such endeavor you must first define the problems that need to be corrected and deal directly with those rather than focus on throwing out the positive parts of our health structure and attempt to redefine the whole system. I believe we have made a grievous error with this crude, terribly expensive, and probably unworkable Obama Care program.

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    Hello,

    I work in the field of tuberculosis control and prevention at the state level. I’m baffled by the lack of TB-specific language in the heart of the ACA. Do I read that dearth of specifics to mean that individual insurance providers in each state can decide for themselves what, if any, TB-related diagnostics, treatment, and medication will be covered?

    Thanks,
    Pete Dupree, MPH

  • Kristen

    QUESTION FROM EMAIL

    Hello, although I concur that this revolutionary act sets the stage for a completely new and beneficial healthcare landscape in the US, I am concerned that some of the provisions will be underfunded or not receive funding as the rollout continues.

    What can be done about that problem?

    Thanx, Paula Duggins