The 2016 US Presidential Election
Examining Possible Health Care Futures

Summary

THE 2016 US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION: Examining Possible Health Care Futures
Presented in Collaboration with Reuters

Health care has emerged as a hotly debated issue of the 2016 presidential election, with the Republican and Democratic presidential nominees expressing starkly different views on the Affordable Care Act (ACA). While approximately 20 million people have gained healthcare coverage since the law’s passage, implementation has been marred by setbacks, including the withdrawal of some major insurers from the ACA marketplace. A new poll by POLITICO and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health shows deep ideological divides between the parties about the healthcare law, with a majority of voters saying they believe the law is failing. In addition, a recent announcement that healthcare premiums for some ACA plans will increase 25 percent on average next year has fed political debate. In this Forum event, expert panelists discussed the implications of the possible outcomes of the 2016 election.

 

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Presented in Collaboration with Reuters

Background Articles

Image Credit: Image of Flag: iStock.com/geopaul; Image of Capitol Building: iStock.com/slowgogo

  • The Forum Moderator

    Welcome everyone. We will start the discussion in about 5 minutes.

  • The Forum Moderator

    We’ll begin in just a few minutes.

  • The Forum Moderator

    Our discussion has begun. We are glad that you could join us today.

  • The Forum Moderator

    This event is in collaboration with Reuters and the two clips that we will show today of nominees Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were provided courtesy of Reuters.

  • The Forum Moderator

    The poll that Professor Blendon is describing is available here: http://www.politico.com/f/?id=00000158-039b-d881-adda-77db04b70000

  • The Forum Moderator

    We will take questions during the end of the conversation. If you have questions for the panelists, email them to theforum@hsph.harvard.edu or post them here.

  • The Forum Moderator

    Information about the Affordable Care Act is available on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at http://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/about-the-law/read-the-law/

  • The Forum Moderator

    Have a question for the panelists? Post them here or email them to theforum@hsph.harvard.edu. We will have a brief Q&A towards the end of this discussion.

  • The Forum Moderator

    Our event is coming to an end soon. We will post the full video on this website tomorrow. We also will post the video on YouTube and iTunesU.

  • The Forum Moderator

    Thank you all for joining us today. Join us again on November 10, 12:30, when we will discuss the chronic pain epidemic.

  • Forum Staff

    Question from an HSPH student: What do you believe are some of the most important considerations policymakers should have in the context of this new upcoming Presidency, in regards to recalibrating our health care system? Can you speak about how widening income disparities may affect policies, and what remain as unaddressed gaps in the current health system to prioritize in 2017?

  • Forum Staff

    Question from an HSPH student: The U.S. is continuing to see a rise in non-communicable diseases, obesity, as well as a resurgence of some infectious disease and substance abuse related illnesses. With larger numbers of aging Americans with these chronic conditions, how can the health system best respond to the needs of America’s burden of disease?

  • Forum Staff

    Question from an HSPH student: We cannot talk about the 2016 Presidential election without talking about women, and women’s healthcare. Whether it be abortion, violence prevention, or access to fair, affordable, and equitable preventative care and treatment, how are women risking losing or winning in this election?

  • Forum Staff

    Question from an HSPH student: Beyond the federal level, how can politics in Washington and this new election change or affect the way states run their healthcare programs, the services they make available, and the facilities they keep accessible to their citizens. We know of the large disparities in health equity among states — what can this election do to remedy these?

  • Forum Staff

    Question from an HSPH student: Healthcare in this country is very political, and young people don’t go out and vote as often as older, retired adults do. This leads to the election of representatives and passing of policies that favor their interests. How can we make sure that individuals who do not have a political voice — America’s children — do not get the short end of the stick as we enter discussions of changing the current healthcare system.

  • Jennifer

    Healthcare delivery systems in the US are becoming larger and more commercialized due to consolidation of private practice. Big healthcare systems dominate patients and control insurance companies leading to substantially increased costs. This behavior takes unfair advantage of patients, their health insurance plans and negatively impacts providers who wish remain in private practice but find it impossible to compete. Does Washington have an ethical responsibility to get involved to reform this healthcare trend?