Jill Goldstein

Dr. Goldstein was a panelist for the Forum’s discussion on Drug Trials.

Jill M. Goldstein, Ph.D. is a Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of Research at the Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). Dr. Goldstein is also a Senior Scientist in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital.

As a clinical neuroscientist with doctoral training in psychiatric epidemiology and psychopathology at Columbia University, and post-doctoral training in clinical neuroscience and brain imaging at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Goldstein is an internationally recognized expert in understanding sex differences in health and diseases associated with the central nervous system. Specifically, Dr. Goldstein’s investigations have focused on characterizing sex differences in the development and adult functioning of the human brain and how these differences contribute to understanding sex differences in psychiatric and neurologic disorders and their comorbidity with general medical disorders.

Her program of research, called the Clinical Neuroscience Laboratory of Sex Differences in the Brain (http://cnl-sd.bwh.harvard.edu) consists of an interdisciplinary team of investigators, integrating structural and functional brain imaging studies, psychophysiology, neuroendocrine studies of hormones and brain function, genetics, inflammatory factors, and collaborative efforts with animal investigators studying genes, hormones, inflammation and the brain (http://mddscor.bwh.harvard.edu).  Brain circuitries under current investigation include the stress response circuitry, memory and working memory (including brain aging), and reward circuitry implicated in the neural control of obesity.  This work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for nearly 30 years. She has published over 160 articles, chapters and other original and peer-reviewed work in these areas.

Dr. Goldstein is also an administrative and educational leader in women’s health and sex differences in medicine, locally and nationally. At BWH, she has built a unique research infrastructure to foster collaborative efforts to understand mechanisms that explain sex differences in health and disease across disciplines and methods of study. She also is the Principal Investigator of a Harvard-wide junior faculty training program on building interdisciplinary careers in women’s health called, “Hormones and Genes in Women’s Health:  From Bench to Bedside” and is committed to training the next generation in this arena in medicine.